Dostoevsky, Frankl, and the Innate Human Desire for Freedom

Dostoevsky, Frankl, and the Innate Human Desire for Freedom

Dostoevsky's Notes from the Underground focuses on the ramblings of the "underground man" as a stand-in for Russian alienation at the turn of the century. The most poignant aspect of his rambling is underground man's depression and his alienation. He sees himself as both elevated above the rabble of humanity, but also completely at odds with [...]

Kierkegaard, The Dark Night of the Soul and What It Can Teach Humanity

Kierkegaard, The Dark Night of the Soul and What It Can Teach Humanity

Kierkegaard, a Danish philosopher, theologian, and poet of the 1800s, is largely regaled as the first Existential Philosopher. His works of Either/Or, Sickness Unto Death, and Fear and Trembling are largely considered pivotal philosophical works that shaped the landscape irrecovably afterwards. Nietzche, Satre, and Camus were largely influenced by his work and expand on his [...]

The Astounding Practicality of Philosophy

The Astounding Practicality of Philosophy

As I write this I am very guiltily trying to ignore the mounds of philosophical texts staring back at me. Kierkegaard's "Sickness Unto Death" beckons, while Augustine's "City of God" is plucking strings in my heart. I'm often not very good at ignoring their requests to be held, read, and consumed. "Read me", they say [...]

Advertisements